Tag Archives: social media

How to look after your mummy bloggers

Following on from my post yesterday about our morning spent with Huggies and some of the UK’s finest Mummy Bloggers, I thought I would just share this video from @glowstars.

Just to caveat, I am not reposting this just because we got a glowing review, but because her perspective on how to engage with Mummy bloggers shines a light on a lot of the rubbish PR attempts that we have seen in recent months.

Thanks again to @glowstars @YoungMummyUk and @Kellyfairy for coming along.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “How to look after your mummy bloggers“, posted with vodpod

The Value Of A Blog

So I have finally succumbed to the idea of setting up my blog in a little more personalised state.

So if you head over to http://jamespoulter.co.uk you will find “Sunday Latte Lamentations” in a somewhat under construction phase.

I am setting up on WordPress (hosted by lovely fellow @leesmallwood – a thoroughly decent chap) . Which obviously means a overhall of themes and widgets, but also a re-evaluation of why I blog, what I blog and how I blog.

After a lovely morning spent down in Kent @ Huggies HQ (Client: Kimberley Clarke) meeting some of the UK’s finest Mum bloggers (@glowstars @YoungMummyUk @Kellyfairy to be precise) really made me think.

I started out blogging as a way of documenting my thoughts and poetry that I began writing in a more serious fashion about 3 years ago (hence the title of this blog – spurred by a poem I wrote by the same name). It really was just the thoughts, ideas and melody that roll out of the life rhythm that is being a Londoner. However over time that changed and moulded into what my blog is today, an amalgamation of social communication-marketing-culture thing, with a quasi-Christian slant on the world. Which interestingly is never what I set out to be about, it just kind of happened that way.

After chatting to the Mums this morning it appear that my experience is not to dissimilar to a lot of bloggers out there, we all start with a passion, a realisation that others might give 2pence about our thoughts, and a desire for a connection with those who share that passion, but over time things get in the way that dilute that (SEO, Google Analytics, #tags).

By no means am I saying that this dilution is a bad thing, I think is just inevitable, however I do wonder what it is that keeps people like you coming back to read these musings.

So that leads me back (kind of) to where I began, as I re-evaluate the way I blog I would love to know why it is you read what I write. What topics interest you, what would you like more of or less of? Or do you honestly just end up clicking inanely on whatever tweetdeck serves you up? (I know I am guilty of that).

I am not out just to please the crowd, but if writing, blogging, journeying, or whatever you call it is truly about passions, and a desire for connection, then it’s always nice to know what you connect with, what you are passionate about, what makes you tick.

So please – let me know.

Monday Musings: The Gutenberg Effect

Morning All. Welcome to your Monday. Here are some digital nuggets to sink your little nashers into for the week of March 8th.

Kicking off with a video spotlight: How The Interenet is Changing Advertising.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

This cracking little “epipheo” presents captures very succinctley something which as been nagging at my brain for a while. Something I like to call “The Gutenberg Effect“. For me the technological shifts that have truely rocked the world have always brought about a new way of thinking and with that new way, an outburst of creativity has spread like wildfire.

Looking back to creation of the printing press, what Gutenberg achieved was not only a technological shift, but a cultural one that allowed people for the first time to hold the printed word in their hands and read it for themselves. A technology that was a key driver in the cultural shift that ultimately ended up becoming The Reformation.

We have seen this process repeat throughout recent history with the creation of commercial radio springing up from the creativity of HAM radio set users in the early 20th century, and then far more recently in the boom of satellite television. Each has created a shift in the way we communicate with one another. Each has demanded something new of the sender and recipient of communication. With print it was undivided attention. With radio it became a background medium, with TV a shared collective experience.

The internet in general, but increasingly the social web provides a different form of communication. A new kind of shared experience, that is not media specific, time specific or geography specific. An experience that is neither broadcast nor narrowcast. Yet is still a shared experience, but that experience is fundamentally different, as for the first time the way in which that experience is consumed lies in the hands of the recipient, NOT the sender.

This means big things for the advertising and marketing industries. It means a change of mindset, a different thinking is required, as we can no longer control or stipulate that a communication has to be consumer OUR way. But be open to the fact that our communication will be consumed, when, where and how the recipient wants. The sooner that marketers get that this shared experience is a movable typing twittering tubing experience, not a media experience, the better.

More on that in the coming weeks…

in other news…

A fantastic dissection of HootSuite for the unitiated from my chum Gemma Went

10 Great Newbie Twitter Mistakes Made By Businesses from Mike Johansson on Social Media Today

And a great presentation from Coca-Cola on Social Media care of Robin Grant @ wearesocial

Monday Musings: #Like Minds & Social Communications

Welcome To Your Monday. Here are some musings for the week of March 1st (eek – it’s here already) 2010.

We kick off today with a couple of summaries from the fantastic #LikeMinds summit, which took place down in Exeter, England on Friday and Saturday last week. We Are Like Minds is a very interesting blend of business, culture, technology and marketing – all connected by (to use Mr Blanchard‘s term) – Social Communications (we are ditching social media for now…). You can check out Olivier’s summary of the summit here. After much internal debate (and some nagging from @drewellis) I had to turn down an invite, which may in hindsight been a mistake – as it looks like all involved had a great time, evidenced by the enthusiasm of my friend Gemma Went‘s summary of the conference here.

#likeminds 2010
The Like Minds 2010 Team (via @thebrandbuilder)

Just to take up Olivier Blanchards point, as I think he has got it as close to right as we can at the moment, “Social Communications” may be an important change in our vernacular – as he make a very well made (and succinct) point – it was never about media in the first place. I truly believe we are not far away from (as I mentioned last week) that social “media” is going away. What we are seeing around us at the moment is not too dissimilar from the evolution of the printing press, radio, television or telephony, merely an evolution of communications.

We are right to point out that there is something of a cultural phenomenon going on here though, so for now to keep the “social” bit attached to the term seems appropriate, as this is a fundamentally different method of communications that what we have seen before, particularly in the business world. Never before has such a freedom of interaction been allowed to foster in business culture, navigating between hierarchy and rank to just connect people to people – finding like minds. That is something different. So for now “social communications” will have to do.

In other news:

“What the Hell is Social Media?” (Good question in the light of the above!) – A great little video wung its way into my reader this week via fellow Surbitonian and all round good guy Rax Lakhani.

A great explanation of integrated communications in the form of “The Big Social Media Marketing Plan” (or should that be communication?) from the pen of Penn Olson

And a fantastic productivity tool via @lifehacker called InBox2 which combines email and socialnetworking to better organise tasks and files in a lovely way. One to try out! (Windows only for now sadly, but a good web app for all you Mac’s out there).

Monday Musings: Social Media IS Going Away

Welcome to your monday, here are some musings for the week of February 22nd.

Kicking off the week with a cracker from a good friend of mine, Mr Jeff Pulver.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

In this video, (origin) filmed during the Real Time discussion at DLD10 which was held on January 25, 2010 in Munich, Germany, Jeff discusses the way that social media IS going away.

Other cracking reads this week include:

Read about how Facebook Mobile Is Now Bigger Than Twitter from Mr Brian Solis

Find out how 30 publishers are charging for online content from the gentleman Neville Hobson

A thoroughly insightful read from my friend and Ex-Boss John Bell on The Psychology of Influence and Sharing

And to round-up your Monday, get further accustomed with TheWayoftheWeb, and look into whether PR should pay bloggers to post?

That little lot should keep you occupied till Tuesday! Enjoy – J.

Changing The Genetics of Downloads: MusicDNA

I write to you this morning after my morning commute, spent majoritively immersed in my “New & Notable” playlist on Spotify for iPhone. I am a recent convert to the paid service, how long I stick with it is yet to be seen, for two reasons. Reason 1: Wednesday’s iTunes announcement, Reason2: MusicDNA – possibly…

Bach Tech - Music DNAYesterday at the Midem Music conference in Cannes Bach Technology announced their latest development: MusicDNA. Billed as the most significant development in digital music since the invention of the MP3, Bach’s Chief Exec Stefan Kohlmeyer hopes the new format will become the MP3s successor.

The new format bundles together the traditional music file with data such as an Artist’s twitter URL, music videos, blog links and YouTube Channels, as well as artwork and lyrics – seemingly a slight evoltion of the Apple iTunes LP format launched last year. In an interview with paidcontent:UK Kohlmeyer said:

“We bundle all the audio data and business intelligence in one file. The data can be automatically updated whenever you are online.”

The idea of this content being able to self-evolve is an interesting one, and if it can be executed seemlessly, without creating enough data-fat to sink the Titanic then it could be an interesting proposition. However is this all just a little too late? When you consider that we have had MySpace for the better part of a decade, and the cult of celebrity twitter stalking taking up much of the red-top gossip pages, it seems we have been getting on OK in hunting down the content-around-the-content for ourselves.

Asking around, I know very few people who have been avidly downloading iTunes LP files, and even lesser major record labels committing to the format in any big way. As always the success of the idea will be in the execution, if MusicDNA is to truly shift the genetics of downloading then the cost, size and adoption by the major manufacturers will allow it to sink or swim, if these ingredients don’t add up, it’ll be just another backwater mutant format. The neutered ninja turtle of the digital age.

Why PR’s Homecoming may not be so sweet

For those of you who follow the PR Moment Blog you may have seen Ben Smith’s post last week about how many PROs are spending only around 50% of their time on media relations these days:

A couple of years ago the vast majority of PROs’ time was spent on media relations. I think most people believe media relations continues to dominate the average working day of PR execs, both those in house and at agencies. That said, in a recent straw poll on PRmoment.com, we asked PROs how much time they spent on media relations. To our surprise, you said only about 50%. Imagine looking the PR agency bosses of the 1990’s in the eye and saying that. You would have been out the door, and quick.

As I mentioned in today’s article on PR Moment, a lot of time is spent developing longer term campaign strategies, that all the more often these days are influencing the marketing directions of clients, far outside the boundaries of PR.

PR 2.0 may come as a shock to some

Holistic marketing and taking a 360 approach to client briefs is meaning more time is being spent by PROs developing engaging content for both the on and offline word, analysing conversations taking place in social media, and developing new and exciting “value exchanges” for journalists (be them citizen or paid) and social users.

The change is gradual at the moment, but particularly when engaging with social media influencers, traditional media relations (Press Release & Push Tactics) will not cut it, as these people are not used to (for now anyway) being pitched to. Hence it is no surprise to me that more time is taken up on these other elements of what @briansolis would call PR 2.0.

This has vast ramifications for the next generations of PROs coming through the ranks – as we saw from last weeks skills report from Major Players (See Ben Cotton’s interview with Edelman’s Marshall Manson on the topic here), many PROs are not embracing these new practices and the changing role of the PRO at the rate that the market demands. Those who want to succeed in this changing space need to adapt. And Fast.