Category Archives: News

Monday Musings: Social Media IS Going Away

Welcome to your monday, here are some musings for the week of February 22nd.

Kicking off the week with a cracker from a good friend of mine, Mr Jeff Pulver.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

In this video, (origin) filmed during the Real Time discussion at DLD10 which was held on January 25, 2010 in Munich, Germany, Jeff discusses the way that social media IS going away.

Other cracking reads this week include:

Read about how Facebook Mobile Is Now Bigger Than Twitter from Mr Brian Solis

Find out how 30 publishers are charging for online content from the gentleman Neville Hobson

A thoroughly insightful read from my friend and Ex-Boss John Bell on The Psychology of Influence and Sharing

And to round-up your Monday, get further accustomed with TheWayoftheWeb, and look into whether PR should pay bloggers to post?

That little lot should keep you occupied till Tuesday! Enjoy – J.

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Changing The Genetics of Downloads: MusicDNA

I write to you this morning after my morning commute, spent majoritively immersed in my “New & Notable” playlist on Spotify for iPhone. I am a recent convert to the paid service, how long I stick with it is yet to be seen, for two reasons. Reason 1: Wednesday’s iTunes announcement, Reason2: MusicDNA – possibly…

Bach Tech - Music DNAYesterday at the Midem Music conference in Cannes Bach Technology announced their latest development: MusicDNA. Billed as the most significant development in digital music since the invention of the MP3, Bach’s Chief Exec Stefan Kohlmeyer hopes the new format will become the MP3s successor.

The new format bundles together the traditional music file with data such as an Artist’s twitter URL, music videos, blog links and YouTube Channels, as well as artwork and lyrics – seemingly a slight evoltion of the Apple iTunes LP format launched last year. In an interview with paidcontent:UK Kohlmeyer said:

“We bundle all the audio data and business intelligence in one file. The data can be automatically updated whenever you are online.”

The idea of this content being able to self-evolve is an interesting one, and if it can be executed seemlessly, without creating enough data-fat to sink the Titanic then it could be an interesting proposition. However is this all just a little too late? When you consider that we have had MySpace for the better part of a decade, and the cult of celebrity twitter stalking taking up much of the red-top gossip pages, it seems we have been getting on OK in hunting down the content-around-the-content for ourselves.

Asking around, I know very few people who have been avidly downloading iTunes LP files, and even lesser major record labels committing to the format in any big way. As always the success of the idea will be in the execution, if MusicDNA is to truly shift the genetics of downloading then the cost, size and adoption by the major manufacturers will allow it to sink or swim, if these ingredients don’t add up, it’ll be just another backwater mutant format. The neutered ninja turtle of the digital age.

Why PR’s Homecoming may not be so sweet

For those of you who follow the PR Moment Blog you may have seen Ben Smith’s post last week about how many PROs are spending only around 50% of their time on media relations these days:

A couple of years ago the vast majority of PROs’ time was spent on media relations. I think most people believe media relations continues to dominate the average working day of PR execs, both those in house and at agencies. That said, in a recent straw poll on PRmoment.com, we asked PROs how much time they spent on media relations. To our surprise, you said only about 50%. Imagine looking the PR agency bosses of the 1990’s in the eye and saying that. You would have been out the door, and quick.

As I mentioned in today’s article on PR Moment, a lot of time is spent developing longer term campaign strategies, that all the more often these days are influencing the marketing directions of clients, far outside the boundaries of PR.

PR 2.0 may come as a shock to some

Holistic marketing and taking a 360 approach to client briefs is meaning more time is being spent by PROs developing engaging content for both the on and offline word, analysing conversations taking place in social media, and developing new and exciting “value exchanges” for journalists (be them citizen or paid) and social users.

The change is gradual at the moment, but particularly when engaging with social media influencers, traditional media relations (Press Release & Push Tactics) will not cut it, as these people are not used to (for now anyway) being pitched to. Hence it is no surprise to me that more time is taken up on these other elements of what @briansolis would call PR 2.0.

This has vast ramifications for the next generations of PROs coming through the ranks – as we saw from last weeks skills report from Major Players (See Ben Cotton’s interview with Edelman’s Marshall Manson on the topic here), many PROs are not embracing these new practices and the changing role of the PRO at the rate that the market demands. Those who want to succeed in this changing space need to adapt. And Fast.

Extending the Chrome: 9 Extensions Worth Knowing

Just before Christmas Google Chrome for Mac & Windows got an update – (the Windows one sadly the more exciting however recent rumblings suggest Mac soon to follow) in the form of Extensions and Shared Bookmarking.

A note firstly on Shared Bookmarking – a clear step at carving another chunk out of the Apple Safari / Mobile Me proposition – allows Chrome and Chromium users to share their bookmarks made in browser across multiple machines using their Google account. A nice little addition however as soon as you dive into the extensions you soon realise this is minor (if not redundant) news – a the first of my 9 Worth Knowing sorts that out far more effectively.

Delicious

This is nothing new, you login to Delicious, it remembers your details, gives you a button next to the address bar. Click it and it will bring up the standard Delicious tagging option. Like I say – nothing new, but interesting as Delicious far outstrips Chrome for organising and syncing bookmarks across multiple machines (and Mobile Me for that matter), therefore making my previous point redundant. Sorry for the wasted time spent reading that.

Google Wave

Another neat little notifier, providing a little icon to let you know how many messages/waves (still haven’t made my mind up what to call them) are unread in your GWave account. However seeing that no one seems to know what to do with Google Wave, there is a bigger issue at play here.

Google Sidewiki

Sidewiki has made headlines, not least with a number of my clients, worrying that consumers will start slander campaigns in the footnotes of Sidewiki all across their websites – a fair concern, but an unlikely reality I feel. However for those who are worried about the sanctity of their sites, the Sidewiki extension is a good option for keeping track of what is going on, along with picking up handy titbits about services (I recommend checking out the SideWiki comments about Twitter & Facebook – interesting stuff).

NPR (National Public Radio)

This is my second fave at the moment, not only am I a bit of a Yank-O-File – but an avid fan of the US’ NPR network (All Things Considered / Planet Money and This American Life to be precise). This little extension gives you single click access to the best audio and text content from NPR, with in-built streaming of audio and the ability to customise tabs by category. Very well done.

Google Mail Notifier

Much the same as the Google Wave Notifier above, this extension is great if you are a GMail user like myself, and gives handy updates for those who prefer to use the web interface rather than running yet another IMAP or POP account out of OutLook or Mail.

Clip to Evernote

Evernote. Currently revolutionising my thought arrangement process seamlessly integrates into the Chrome browsing experience with this simple point and shoot Clipper. Select text, an object or image, click the little Elephant Icon and away you go. Opt to select just text or capture the whole content of a page.

Google Similar Pages

This is a very interesting one. Similar Pages from Google working of the “related search” and “wonderwheel” search tech, will give you 4 options of “similar pages” to those you are browsing according to what other pages share similar search terms as the one you are viewing. Confused? Don’t be. Ignoring the tech it does what it says on the tin, however for more niché sites its a little on the buggy/non-existent side in its recommendations.

Feedly

MY OUT AND OUT FAVORITE. If like me you find Google Reader great as a standard, but rubbish as a reading/usr experience, then I cannot recommend Feedly high enough (full review coming in due course). All I will say for now is that take the pleasure of reading a magazine + the content of your RSS collection = feedly. This is about as close to the offline browsing experience as I have found to date. Add in the experimental “karma” project, to see how the links you tweet are shared around, and you have a truly fantastic app.

I include this in my extensions to look at – however it deserves far more attention that being 1 in a list of 9.

Send to GMail

Well this does what it says on the tin. Select text, click the button and send it to the body of an email using your Gmail Account. Those using Google Apps on their site have additional functionality in being able to customise the subject line or start text of the email. Other than that – a good utility for the GMail user.

So there we have it – try them out, and let me know if you have any you think are worth a look in/review.

Doing Digital With A Dragon

I had the pleasure of filming an interview with ex-dragons den, current investor at large – Richard Farleigh. A man who has made his millions through taking risks in the post-dot-com-fallout and has worked with hundred of companies to drive business success.

This video was filmed as part of the wider work we are doing at Ogilvy for IBM’s Future Focus programme, looking at how businesses can work smarter by utilizing advances in technology and communications.

Smart technology is a funny one, some of the simple things that we as the “young digerati” take for granted are the very systems and practices that will become the future of business communications. Talking with a friend who is far more clued up on the subject (@gemmapercy for more info), it dawned on me that so much of the tech that forms the discourse around “cloud” computing and “viruslisation” is not tales of future technology, but present technology. Facilities such as Google Docs, delicious and Amazon’s S3 storage are already changing the way we work.

Far more of our everyday data is being stored in “the cloud” rather than on our hard disks, from our databases, contacts and bookmarks to our personal data such as photos and increasingly video. As Russel M Davies points out in his article on Amazon S3 in this June’s issue of Wired UK – I too would rather trust Google with my contacts than my own ability to sit on my assortment of handheld media centres (the less fortunate of which glare at me every time I open my desk drawer). It is more or less a weekly occurrence that I get invited to a facebook group of one of my clumsier chums who has sat on / dropped / digested in drunken stupor their phone and now require me to send them my number. Which proves a number of things a) my friends are stupid, b) there are many people that I am very glad now have no ability to call me (not that they ever had reason to before hand) and c) that we may all be better of outsourcing our personal lives to the likes of Google or Amazon.

Russel M Jarvis in Wired UK - June Issue

Russel M Davies in Wired UK - June Issue

I now await the cries of sacrilege from every Orwellian within ear shot, the words “big brother” and “nanny state” reverberating off the bloggosphere ring in our ears when we think of handing over the precious little scraps of data that we can truly can call our own anymore. But these solutions may well be the technologies that bring us back together rather than drive us apart. The decentralization that has taken place has sought to crowd us into buildings but talk less to one another. Maybe the future of sharing resources can truly foster the global village which has so long been heralded. The future of businesses that embrace these practices look healthier, wealthier and all together a more pleasant working experience. May be the “cloud” holds a silver lining yet…

Monday Mocha Musing – Edition 2: Guest Post: Facebook’s fresh privacy fracas: By Lewis Webb (Shiny Red)

Good afternoon all. This week’s Monday Mocha Musing comes from friend and fellow social media expert Lewis Webb (@lewiswebb) from Shiny Red “ joint venture between The Red Consultancy and the founders of UK blog network Shiny Media.” Lewis has been working in Social Media since 2002 and has worked across a wide range of tech clients to more consumer brands.

Lewis’ post this week looks at the new content regulations of Facebook, and how it may effect your digital freedom, and copywrite protection.

And now… on with the post…

 

You hereby grant Facebook an irrevocable, perpetual, non-exclusive, transferable, worldwide license to use, copy, publish, stream, store, retain, publicly perform or display, scan, reformat, modify, edit, adapt, create derivative works and distribute, any user content you post on or in connection with the Facebook Service.

That’s paraphrased directly from Facebook’s new terms and conditions, which – as you can imagine – has caused not a small amount of discussion in the world of social media. From expelled students and  Royal breakups to its over-intrusive Beacon platform, Facebook has been courting controversy rather more than it might like to admit over the last 12 months. On top of this, the social network has yet to answer questions around data portability in a convincing way. While reception to its interoperability platform “Connect” was positive, their spokesperson at Le Web in Paris was rightly called out by Michael Arrington for paying little more than lip service to the idea of open standards in social media. At its core, Facebook remains a walled garden and that’s unlikely to change any time soon.

These new T&Cs don’t help its cause one bit, but while those “in the know” will tut and shake their heads in despair, it’s unlikely that the average Facebook user will notice any difference at first – so why should they care? Well why not compare this attitude with Flickr’s “if it’s not public, it’s all yours” content policy – which, incidentally, terminates should you remove it from the site unlike the new FB small-print. It seems that in the world of social media there’s an ideological debate going on where companies on the statist Left want to control and take ownership of content, while the open-source Right takes a more libertarian approach to it all. Of course there’s a balance to be struck, but this recent development only strengthens the argument of those who shy away from social media for fear details about their lives being controlled by or falling into the wrong hands. But perhaps the social network should be more concerned about the “what-if” factor… as an established consumer brand around the world, if FB trips itself up through misuse of the new “agreement” any time soon, you can expect the backlash to go beyond the online media set to its core audience of (so-far) contented everyday users.

Thanks to Lewis for this, you can also find it on the Shiny Red Blog, and Lewis’ own musings at Social ProBiotic

Next Week – Nick Fell, Ogilvy One (@nickfell) will give us his musing. Check it out here, next monday.

TweetValue – Tweeting Back to 1999?

TweetValue – Tweeting Back to 1999?

A mate of mine back when he was 15, about 6 years ago, bought up a bunch of three letter domains – e.g. http://www.cbs.com? (well not that one, but man that would have been a good shout). He sold them off one by one, some for a couple of quid, (that’s pounds to US readers!) some for a couple of grand!

As twitter goes mainstream there seem to be a revival of this .com boom phenomenom, buying and selling of popular twitter user names!

According to TweetValue my username @jamespoulter is fetching $149 USD, compared to upwards of $40000 for @barackobama, however I don’t think the WhiteHouse will be selling that off anytime soon. TweetEvangel Mr. Jonny Ross – @wossy is only worth a meager $849 – and now he’s back on our screens I doubt Jonathon will be selling up his follow spot any time soon.

How much are you worth? Reply here and let me know?